Take 10: Joy Reid

Take 10: Joy Reid

I remember one occasion in Papua New Guinea when a villager gave me a necklace which was worth about four months wages, allowing for the time and skill involved. It brought me to tears, that a near stranger would bestow such a huge honour upon me … just because I was coming to tell his story.

Joy Reid

Julia Bloore chit-chats with this vivacious young news reporter …

1. You’re a journalist for television news – is that what you always wanted to do? 

JOY: To be honest, I never gave it much thought until I lived overseas for a year when I was 16. While I was away I’d write letters home, and it was my grandmother who suggested journalism as a career-path. She felt she was experiencing my overseas adventures through my writing. I began to realise that broadcast journalism provided the perfect outlet for my ‘gift of the gab’ – my love of storytelling and my sense of social justice.

Television is exciting, fast paced, and pictures are powerful tools. But my first love is radio journalism. I did that for five years before making the switch to TVNZ.

If you’d asked me when I was a teenager if I’d be a television reporter, reporting on the biggest story of the decade (Christchurch Earthquakes), I would have balked … but I am very happy with how things have turned out. The role definitely has its challenges, it certainly has its rewards as well.

2. When you were 10, what was it that you were ‘the best’ at?

JOY: I think my parents would say TALKING! I’ve always been a chatterbox. My primary school teacher even wrote in a school report that I was ‘verbally mature’ …

3. What are you reading at the moment? 

JOY: Philippa Gregory’s historical novels about the various kings and queens of the 15th and 16th centuries. I love the way she personalises history! I’m such a book worm – I can get lost for hours in a good book.

4. What’s the best piece of advice your mother gave you?

JOY: She always said, “Do your best, and that way you can never be disappointed …” And it’s worked! You can’t do better than your best – and if you don’t succeed at least you know you gave it all you could.

5. If there was to be a movie made of your life, who would you want to play you and why? More importantly, who would play your husband? 

JOY: I’d want Kate Winslett to play me. I like her down-to-earth style. And I think Brad Pitt would be a fair contender to play my hubby. They practically look like twins (wink wink) …

6. Tell us about the best day of your life so far … 

JOY: I have lots of ‘best’ days. My wedding day, walking down the aisle and seeing my man waiting for me was pretty epic. But I’ve certainly had ‘best’ days while travelling, when holidaying with friends, and especially when working in Africa.

I think so long as the people I love are involved, then it becomes a ‘best’ day.

7. What’s your all-time favourite meal?

JOY: Given that I’m pregnant, I’m LOVING potatoes and pasta. Generally though, my favourite meal is simply fish and chips. In fact, my hubby proposed to me after such a meal. It was perfect.

8. Where do you come in your family? 

JOY: I’m the oldest of four children. And, typical of oldest children, I’m the bossy one in the family. I was more independent as a teenager, and I’m still often the organiser/instigator of family events. My youngest brother and I have similar personalities though …

9. What’s the nicest thing anyone has ever done for you?

JOY: I thought it was pretty nice of my husband to ask to spend his life with me! But, in all seriousness, I’m the type of person who appreciates the little things in life, so I could write pages of things which, in that moment, were the ‘nicest’. Someone bringing me food when I haven’t eaten for hours (often happens while out-and-about on a story) … someone providing a listening ear … someone buying/making me a surprise gift or giving me a note of encouragement … even someone taking the time to fly to Christchurch to visit.

I remember one occasion in Papua New Guinea when a villager gave me a necklace which was worth about four months wages, allowing for the time and skill involved. It brought me to tears, that a near stranger would bestow such a huge honour upon me … just because I was coming to tell his story.

10. Imagine 10 years from now: where are you? what are you doing? who are you doing it with?

JOY: That’s a tough one. I’d hope to have had a few children and be in the throes of motherhood. But I also hope to still have a hand in journalism. I love telling the stories of those who are unable to tell their own – so I’d be keen to explore this avenue more, whether in NZ or overseas, on television or another medium. Perhaps even working for a not-for-profit organisation. It all depends how balancing work and motherhood goes!

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